Position papers
  • 25-May
  • 2017

São Paulo, May 25th, 2017

His Excellency President of Brazil, Michel Temer,

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture – movement formed by civil society representatives, the business sector and the academic community – requests to the President of the Republic to veto the provisional acts 756/2016 and 758/2016. These provisional acts approved by the Senate plenary on May 23rd (bills 4/2017 and 17/2017) reduced the Jamanxim National Forest (Flona), in the municipality of Novo Progresso (PA), the National Park (Parna) of Jamanxim, in the municipalities of Itaituba and Trairão (PA) and the Parna of São Joaquim (SC).

The approval of these provisional acts goes against the protection of the environment and the battle with the growing deforestation in Brazilian biomes. Moreover, it compromises the credibility of the necessary economic development initiatives in the country. These acts bring irreparable damage to biodiversity and climate and will benefit a few individuals at the expense of the national interest.

The approval of these laws will withdraw the protection of 588.5 thousand hectares of forests in the Amazon and cause the reduction of 20% of Parna de São Joaquim, one of the main refuges of the Atlantic Forest biodiversity, the most threatened biome in the country. It will result in increased illegal exploitation and depredation encouraged by the highest authority of the Republic, creating an undesirable precedent for new occupations of areas preserved in Conservation Units (Unidades de Conservação, UCs).

Jamanxim Flona, created in February 2006, along with other UCs, has an important role in the region and form a green barrier with more than 6.4 million hectares. This initiative managed to contain the overwhelming advance of deforestation along the BR-163 – a highway that connects Cuiabá (MT) to Santarém (PA) – which increased by more than 650% between 2001 and 2004, as a result of the acceleration of speculation Real estate of public lands.

Sectors that defend the approval of the reduction of these invaluable protected areas argue that the difficulties faced by the government to implement this protection prevented the effective control of illegal and predatory exploitation caused by deforestation and mining. However, reducing them is the worst way to try to solve the problems, which will actually worsen without legal protection. The analysis of the images obtained by the MapBiomas platform show the very high risk to which these areas will be submitted. These maps show that from 2004 to 2016 Jamanxim Flona lost more than 117 thousand hectares of forests, which released 70 million tons of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere according to calculations by the Environmental Research Institute of the Amazon (Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia, IPAM). By 2030, the reduction of these areas can result in 280,000 hectares of less forests and in the emission of 140 million tons of CO2. This process needs to be avoided.

It is important to point out that the ICMBio, a federal body responsible for the management of UCs, has acknowledged in a report that the occupation of Jamanxim Flona is recent, stating that 67.7% of the occupants arrived there just before or shortly after its creation, in 2006. This data proves that the occupations had a speculative character.

Other legislative and executive proposals threaten the Amazon Region Protected Areas Program (Programa Áreas Protegidas da Amazônia, ARPA), which supports the UCs management in the region. The use of resources in ARPA (about US$ 215 million from international donors) is tied to a number of commitments, such as the maintenance of protected areas. Thus, the Government projects aimed at reducing, recategorizing and altering the limits of conservation units clearly disregard a Brazilian commitment, which may affect the investments of one of the world's largest programs of forest conservation in history.

The provisional acts approved by the Senate will affect legal security and will undermine investments in the country, moving away demanding investors and consumers of sustainable production systems. In a world in which socio-environmental criteria are increasingly at the heart of decision-making processes of large investors, Brazil is moving away from the possibility to become a competitive and respected economy.

In a scenario of intensified deforestation in Amazônia in the last two years, provisional acts such these ones stimulate predatory occupation and disregard for environmental protection areas, jeopardizing gains obtained in attempts to control deforestation in the region, and damage the image of the country and agribusiness.

Land regularization of areas with illegal deforestation can not be authorized by the Government. Otherwise, it will not be feasible to stop illegal deforestation, as expected by the Brazilian Forest Code, or to comply with the international climate and biodiversity agreements assumed by the country, such as the NDC implementation, which is fundamental for the development of a low carbon economy.

Brazil needs a national policy to address the challenges of illegal occupation and deforestation and to guarantee sustainability for the logistic projects in the Amazon, as in the case of Ferrogrão. The handling of these bills in Congress has not been successful and associates the railroad with unnecessary damage to the forest, biodiversity and climate. This drives out investors and may result in judicial inquiries. It is necessary to resume this debate, with technical bases and broad stakeholder participation.

The first step in this direction, President, is, in our view, the integral veto of the bills 04/2017 and 17/2017.

 

Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture

 

Deforestation growth in Jamanxim National Forest from 2000 to 2016

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 23-Mar
  • 2017

Low-carbon Agriculture Working Group

São Paulo, March 23, 2017 - Technical assistance and dissemination of technology in the Brazilian countryside are topics of fundamental importance to the new economy, based on low emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Among the actions that should be part of the guidelines for the implementation of the Brazilian NDC (Nationally Determined Contributions) are the strengthening of technical assistance and rural extension organizations, training actions, and technology transfer. These actions will effectively contribute to the implementation of a low-carbon agriculture in all activities involved, supporting the recovery of degraded pastures, the integrated crop-livestock-forestry system (ICLF) and the forest recovery/restoration.

In this sense, in order to broaden the discussions and in search of widely agreed solutions, the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture promoted in Brasilia, at the end of last year, a round table discussion with several professionals in the area. Conceived and organized by the Low-carbon Agriculture Working Group (GT ABC), the event had four panels composed by professionals from the public, private and civil society sectors, divided into:

  1. Public policies to promote technical assistance and dissemination of technology for family farming;
  2. Technical assistance in the private sector;
  3. Opportunities and synergies in the public and private sector; and
  4. Qualification of technical assistance professionals.

During five hours of debates, the following points were listed among the main challenges:

  • Non-methodological standardization of technical assistance and dissemination of technology for family farming: The particularities in this niche are given by different types of producers, productive arrangements and land use. All this reflects on specific policies. Therefore, technical assistance must have participatory approaches and quality, and be comprehensive and free. This demands human resources, time and strategy. Considering existing technical assistance programs from the federal government for family farming, we highlight those focused on agroecology and sustainability, and related to Low-Carbon Agriculture (ABC). It is worth mentioning that the National Policy for Technical Assistance and Rural Extension (PNATER) was created in 2010 and focuses on family farming.
  • Agricultural census: Updating producer profile data by region of the country through the agricultural census is strategic and decisive. It was planned for 2016, but it did not happen. The regional characterization of rural properties is extremely important and will allow the development of technical assistance and dissemination of technology strategies that can be applied to the needs of rural landowners.
  • Monitoring of results: In addition to diagnosing the needs of the producer, it is important to promote and monitor collaboratively the results of technical assistance to track the continuous improvement of processes. In this sense, there are already good examples of success in partnerships between private initiative and NGOs, connecting the producer and the monitoring.
  • Long-term vision: The private initiative points out that technical assistance experiences bring gains to all parties involved, with continuous improvement. However, for some themes, the results are not immediately perceived. The positive point identified by the private sector is that agricultural activity gains efficiency and productivity when the producer adapts their activities to sustainability standards (including compliance with environmental, social and labor legislation). In some cases, the industry pays them better or they reach new markets with better quality products.
  • Involving the entire production chain: Training, especially related to accessing new technologies and knowledge, must involve different participants from the productive chains - from producers to banking agents, including technicians.

Based on collected perceptions, GT ABC listed key measures focused on low-carbon agriculture in Brazil in order to improve technical assistance and dissemination of technology, with the objective of reaching the commitments agreed by the country in the Paris Agreement and translated into the Brazilian NDC.

  • Incentive to the generation and diffusion of participatory technology, with the explicit adhesion of rural producers.
  • Small-scale or territorial technical assistance planning at municipal or regional level that meets local challenges and specificities.
  • Active participation of the states, through the ABC State Plans, and state agencies for technical assistance and dissemination of technology.
  • Establishment of partnerships between public and private sectors, universities, agriculture federations, trade unions and financial agents. To achieve success and gain scale, it is necessary to establish partnerships and distribute responsibilities among the various participants of the productive chains.
  • Inclusion of low-carbon production techniques and integrated training, including business management and environmental and social aspects, in technical assistance.
  • Training of qualified technicians who are familiar with low-carbon production practices and prepared to assist the producer. This is still a significant gap.

Aware of the importance of technical assistance and dissemination of technology for the achievement of the Brazilian goals regarding to GHG emission reduction, the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture intends to work with the federal government, private sector and civil society throughout this year of 2017 to advance the opportunities of enhancement of technical assistance and dissemination of technology, contributing to the scale gain of low-carbon agriculture in the country and compliance with the Brazilian NDC.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 14-Mar
  • 2017

São Paulo, March 14, 2017 – The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture expresses its concern about the alarming increase in the deforestation rate, as well as its disagreement with recent legislative proposals that can reduce the protected areas in Conservation Units in the Amazon. The increase in forest deforestation places Brazil in the opposite direction of its goals for the National Policy on Climate Change for 2020 and compromises the Brazilian target set during the Paris Agreement.

In this moment when the country seeks to restore its confidence by retaking responsible economic management with focus on achieving its goals, it is crucial to return to the climate agenda objectives, especially in what regards to the drastic reduction of deforestation.

Data from the INPE (National Institute for Space Research) show that deforestation increased by 60% between 2014 and 2016. In 2016, the rate of deforestation reached almost 8,000 km2, more than twice the rate needed for the country to achieve the 80% reduction target for deforestation in 2020 set by the National Policy on Climate Change.

A study by the Environmental Research Institute of the Amazon (IPAM) shows that deforestation has increased within Conservation Units, as well as in public areas not yet destined to a specific use and in rural properties that are part of the Rural Environmental Registry (CAR). More than half of all deforested areas detected by INPE are part of the CAR.

This scenario is incompatible with Brazil's recent past: between 2005 and 2012 the country was one of the countries that most contributed to climate change mitigation. The positive result of that period was achieved, among other measures, by the substantial decrease in the Amazon deforestation, a consequence of successful strategies such as continuous monitoring, repression of illegal exploitation and the creation of Conservation Units. The deforestation reached 27,000 km2 in 2004, but decreased to 4,500 km2 in 2012, during a period of extraordinary progress in the Brazilian agricultural production. The recent reversal of this trend, with a sharp increase in deforestation, coincides with the decrease in the frequency of DETER data releases, the reduction of command and control actions, the interruption of the creation of new Conservation Units as well as the proposals to reduce old protected areas, low investment and lack of incentives for the conservation of forests and sustainable activities. In addition, based on preliminary data from the federal government, this upward trend should continue or even worsen in the coming years, jeopardizing the Brazilian climate commitment in the Paris Agreement — one of its pillars is to achieve zero illegal deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon until 2030.

Moreover, in recent months, congressmen and public agents have proposed the reduction of protected areas of the Conservation Units in the Amazon in about one million hectares. This is opposite to everything that the country has been defending nationally and internationally. The Brazilian Coalition understands that such actions open the way to greater forest destruction and put at risk traditional populations and economic activities directly or indirectly linked to the forest, such as agriculture, which is responsible for almost 25% of Brazil’s GDP.

It is crucial to resume the integrated agenda for the control of deforestation urgently, with actions that include (i) to resume the monthly disclosure of DETER deforestation alerts, (ii) to suspend the land regularization and credit processes and to make sure the parts involved in illegal deforestation will be held responsible, (iii) to implement a task force to promote the conservation and sustainable use of 60 million hectares of public forests not yet destined to a specific use and (iv) to suspend immediately all plans to reduce the Conservation Units.

The search for greater balance between forest conservation and the efficient use of our soils for agricultural production is one of the biggest challenges for Brazil in the coming years. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply, a country that produces 7% — aiming to reach 10% in five years — of the world's food must be responsible and committed to the proper use of its natural resources.

Brazil is a central piece in the global efforts to face the challenges of climate change. The country has the technology necessary to increase its productivity without relying on deforestation. It also has the aspiration to be a more fair and responsible country towards its citizens and the planet. For this, it needs to develop, expand its economy, strengthen its agricultural production and, at the same time, protect its natural assets.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 13-Mar
  • 2017

São Paulo, March 13, 2017 - The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture considers that the efficiency and effectiveness of the regulatory processes conducted by the Brazilian State are central elements for the greater dynamism of the economy and the construction of a more prosperous, fair and sustainable development model, generating employment and income.

For this purpose, the process of reviewing the environmental licensing regulatory framework, which is already underway, should aim to stimulate economic activity in line with the preservation of socio-environmental assets and the commitments made by Brazil in the international negotiations on climate change and biodiversity conservation.

A new licensing regulatory framework should be based on transparency, efficiency and sustainability, guaranteeing legal certainty and predictability for economic agents, without causing damage to the preservation of the environment. It should also be combined with a long-term planning that considers the comparative advantages of the different regions of Brazil and incorporates the technologies for a competitive, sustainable and low-carbon economy.

In this sense, we understand that the Environmental Licensing General Law should be supported by the following principles and guidelines:

(i) federal legislation should establish national criteria for environmental licensing procedures, in order to standardize the process, reducing legal uncertainty and discretion among federative entities;

(ii) the licensing process, including cases with licensing exemption, should be defined in a standardized way, based on an updated analysis of the frameworks of the activities subject to environmental licensing and the socio-environmental fragility or importance of the place of the enterprise;

(iii) activities and enterprises involving the suppression of native vegetation must undergo the environmental licensing process, without jeopardizing the compliance with the procedures established to obtain the respective authorizations and the restrictions provided in current legislation;

(iv) environmental licensing should be structured so as to facilitate integration with other territorial management systems, such as the Rural Environmental Registry (CAR), the Environmental Regularization Program (PRA), the Ecological-Economic Zoning, the maps of the Priority Areas for Conservation, Sustainable Use and Benefit Sharing of Brazilian Biodiversity and municipal legislation on land use and occupation. It should also consider other existing requirements, such as the Forest Code;

(v) the current lists of frameworks for activities subject to environmental licensing should be reviewed as they are outdated and have imperfections, such as establishing that any forestry activity regardless of size and location should be qualified as a project of significant environmental impact;

(vi) ensure legal certainty so that the activities exempted from licensing, due to their location or nature, have this right respected;

(vii) the environmental licensing process should be based on the principle of transparency, and the National System of Environmental Information (SINIMA) should make available technical references of the studies already presented, allowing the use of existing diagnoses in the case of enterprises located in the same area of influence of processes already licensed;

(viii) maintenance of the obligation to hold a public hearing whenever the environmental licensing process is established based on the Environmental Impact Study (EIA), in accordance with current legislation, in order to guarantee the participation of the populations potentially affected by the enterprise;

(ix) definition of deadlines for all stages of the licensing, in order to ensure predictability of the process, guaranteeing to license(s) applicants and to the society better monitoring capacity from investors and society;

(x) investments in technical training, human resources and infrastructure in the environmental agencies responsible for licensing activities, in order to guarantee the quality of the processes and compliance with legal deadlines;

(xi) establishment of minimum institutional capacity criteria that should be verified by the municipalities interested in assuming the environmental licensing processes; and,

(xii) definition of objective criteria for licensing procedures in federal legislation and their respective regulations, in order to reduce the discretionary power of the licensing body.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 08-Mar
  • 2017

São Paulo, March 8, 2017 - The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture participated in the launch of the National System for the Control of the Origin of Forest Products - Sinaflor, held yesterday in Brasília, with the presence of the Minister of the Environment, Sarney Filho, and the president of Ibama, Suely Araújo.

Sinaflor is a system that integrates other platforms from Ibama, such as the Forest Origin Document (DOF) and the Annual Operational Plan (POA), as well as the Rural Environmental Registry National System (Sicar). One of its objectives is to improve the control of the origin of products, such as wood and coal, tracking all the process, from authorizations of exploration to their transport, storage, industrialization and export. Therefore, it aims to increase the degree of security and reliability of the systems as a whole.

All states in the country are expected to use Sinaflor as of 2018 to issue operating and marketing authorizations for these products.
For the Brazilian Coalition, the first version of Sinaflor, presented yesterday, represents an important step for the timber sector. “The system brings progress for the productive chain of native wood, which suffers from irregularities in its production processes. The minister and the president of Ibama also pledged to launch a new version of Sinaflor by the end of the year, responding to traceability and transparency challenges. The Brazilian Coalition is ready to contribute to this process”, said Marcelo Furtado, facilitator at the Brazilian Coalition, who participated in the event's opening table.

“Sinaflor still needs some improvements, but it can already reduce significantly the possibility of fraud by bringing more operational security to the issuing of permits for timber extraction”, says Jeanicolau de Lacerda, an assessor at Precious Woods company and one of the leaders of the Coalition's Tropical Forest Economy Working Group. He and other members of the Working Group were also present at the launch.

For the Working Group, it is still necessary to find concrete ways to promote the broad traceability and transparency of information on the origin and final destination of timber products. These are key elements for achieving two objectives of the Brazilian Coalition, which are to curb illegality in the sector and increase the area of sustainable managed forest in the country by 10-fold, reaching 25 million hectares by 2030. This will promote the fight against illegal deforestation and lead to a more sustainable forest economy based on the correct management of forests and the generation of income and quality jobs throughout the production chain. “Transparency puts the spotlight on enterprises that operate in the right way. It encourages the maintenance of forests, the respect for local communities and the preservation of natural resources. It also contributes to the development of adequate public policies that bring the whole sector to legality”, says Leonardo Sobral, forest manager at Imaflora, who also leads the Tropical Forest Economy Working Group.

The tropical timber market is responsible for more than 200,000 direct jobs and produces 13 million m3 of log/year, generating a gross annual income of R$ 4.3 billion. However, according to data from the Institute BVRio, about 80% of timber sold in the country seems to be illegal and is not certified.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 08-Feb
  • 2017

São Paulo, February 8, 2017 - Brazil has today more than 300 million hectares of natural forests in the Amazon region, but less than three million hectares are sustainably managed. There are huge challenges in terms of conservation and the country has the highest annual rate of conversion of terrestrial ecosystems in the world.

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture believes that a competitive, thriving and sustainable forest-based economy that simultaneously guarantees the conservation and production of natural forests — through actions such as good forest management, forests restoration and related social benefits — can provide a fundamental contribution to support Brazil's commitments to the reduction of greenhouse gas emission (GHG), as well as to strengthen resilience and enable the country to adapt to climate change.

The major problem in the sector today is the high level of illegality and informality of wood production in the Amazon, which has damaged businesses and reduced investments. In this context, the objective of the Coalition's Tropical Forest Economy working group is to increase by 10-fold the area of sustainably managed forest in Brazil by 2030 (as per the Coalition’s proposal 14, copied below). This will result in 25 million hectares under sustainable management, in addition to controlling the sale of illegal wood products from native forests.
Sustainable forest management in Brazil:

  • is an economic activity with great capacity for generating income(1), creating jobs(2) and collecting taxes in rural areas;
  • has the potential to contribute more to the country’s exports(3);
  • combines production with conservation of forests, contributing to the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity, as well as key services such as water supply and carbon stocks;
  • its promotion and expansion are one of the priority points of Brazil’s NDC (Nationally Determined Contributions).

Considering all these points, one of the Brazilian Coalition’s priorities is to promote and enhance the forest economy derived from tropical forest management, with the aim to encourage sustainable forest management. To achieve this objective, Proposal 14 lists a few strategic actions. Some of them were prioritized for urgent action, in conjunction with the public sector:

  1. To provide transparency and access to logging permits and documents related to the control of tropical timber flows (DOFs, Forest Origin Documents), so as to allow the monitoring of management operations by society in general, with the objective of reducing the unfair supply and competition with products of illegal origin;
  2. To increase demand for products of legal and sustainable origin, requiring that all public procurement of timber products require traceability from their origin to the final product, giving preference to products certified by FSC (Forestry Stewardship Council) and/or by Cerflor (Brazilian Forest Certification Program).

The Brazilian Coalition believes that the combination of these measures is fundamental for the process of improving the economic conditions necessary for the legal and sustainable tropical forest management.

At the same time, we propose the creation of an intersectoral working group coordinated by the Brazilian Coalition that includes participants from the public, private and NGO sectors, as well as the academic community, in order to recommend public policies and promote actions to be adopted by both the public and private sectors that result in the removal of barriers, the implementation of initiatives to promote sustainable forest management and the prevention of illegal logging of native forest products.

 

BRAZILIAN COALITION ON CLIMATE, FORESTS AND AGRICULTURE’S PROPOSAL 14

Increase the area of sustainably managed forest in Brazil by 10-fold, by 2030, and curb the sale of illegal wood products from native forests. Strategic actions include:

  1. Ensure complete transparency of authorizations and monitoring of management operations for native forests.
  2. Employ tracking technology for geo-referencing all production chains, based on the use of products from managed native forests, and their respective monitoring and inspection, at least every 5 years.
  3. Encourage voluntary certification by FSC or Cerflor, for products originating from the sustainably managed native forests, and adopt a minimum standard for control, similar to “controlled timber” on the referred to certifications, for noncertified products.
  4. Assign co-responsibility to purchasers of products from illegal, non-traceable sources.
  5. After 2020, tax all products that are untraceable, at a rate of 40% of their estimated market value, before being released for sale. The amounts collected by this tax, on a state level, would be used to develop programs for sustainable reintegration in the production chain and help in the monitoring and control of illegal logging.
  6. After 2020, all public purchases, direct and indirect, and those by organizations that receive any type of public funding, would be required to purchase traceable forest products, from harvest through the chain of custody
  7. Encourage private companies to require traceable forest products in their purchases.
  8. Give preference to purchase of forest products certified by the FSC and/or Cerflor, which include a guarantee of traceability, in their bidding processes.

São Paulo, 8 February 2017

Tropical Forest Economy working group
Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture

(1) The sector produces approximately 13 million m3/year, generating a gross annual income of R$ 4.3 billion. (Brazilian Forest Service, 2013).
(2) The sector generates more than 200,000 direct jobs, 2% of the economically active population in the region. (PEREIRA ET AL, 2010).
(3) In 2012, export trade in the Legal Amazon reached about US$ 500 million. (Brazilian Forest Service, 2013).

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en